Scale the ePortfolio

    • Low stakes means that students and instructors have less pressure on an assignment that involves some work towards an eportfolio.
    • Medium stakes means that either instructors of students have some pressure from the eportfolio
    • High stakes means that both instructors and students have the most pressure on this version of an eportfolio
SHOW

Low Stakes

Medium Stakes

High Stakes

Collect

Students are asked to identify and store an assignment that they’re proud of.

Students are asked to identify and store an assignment that meets a course or programmatic outcome.

Students are asked to identify and store all assignments that meet a course or programmatic outcome.

Remediate

Students are asked to consider making changes to an assignment for future use.

Students are encouraged to make changes to their work to better represent their academic progress through a course or program.

Students must post a final, revised, polished version of their work.

Reflection

Students are asked to think about what kinds of skills they are developing in completing an assignment.

Students are asked to document the skills they are developing while they are completing an assignment in some written form.

Students are asked to reflect on the skills that they developed while completing an assignment and then consider how those skills can help them with future goals.

Integration

Students are asked to consider how skills from an assignment might transfer from that original assignment to a new one within the same course.

Students are asked to consider how skills from an assignment transfer from one assignment to a different course assignment in the same program. This can take many different forms: paper, presentation, matrix, video etc.

Students are asked to analyze and synthesize how their skills transfer from one course to another in a different program; or how those skills transfer into a professional setting. This can take many different forms: paper, presentation, matrix, video etc.

Assessment

Instructors can ask students to submit materials that are germane to the course, and then ask them to hold onto it for when they have a medium/high stakes eportfolio assignment.

Instructors can ask students to submit materials that are pass/fail, where they turn in assignments germane to the course, and then ask them to include it in a course portfolio with the final project.

Instructors can ask students to submit drafts, remediated assignments, and edited versions in order to offer multiple opportunities for students to submit their best work to a final portfolio, which is also assessed for points rather than completeness.

Collaboration

Instructors can ask students to participate in a peer review activity where students review materials that might be included in a portfolio at another time.

Instructors can ask students to participate in peer review in order to post a remediated version of the assignment to the final portfolio.

Instructors can ask students to review and provide feedback to their peers while they review a final draft of the eportfolio with all artifacts, and framing language included.

Technology

Students can collect drafts of their work as handwritten artifacts, photographs of those artifacts, or they can keep track of born digital documents that they created for course work. They can store those assignments on a flash drive, or within an eportfolio system to frame at a later date.

Students can showcase their work within a course by providing a PDF of all of their work they hoped to include in their portfolio to their classmates. This could also be included in an eportfolio building tool that allows students to attach reflections about that specific artifact.

Students can claim a domain where they store their work across their academic career and then build a website that showcases the work stored on their own server. This is the most sophisticated way to maintain access to the actual artifacts, and the most difficult to learn how to use.

Public

Students can keep their work private between themselves and the instructor within the course.

Students can keep their work private within the course, but have peers comment, and provide feedback separate from the portfolio

Students can make their work public and available by hosting their work on a content management system, and building a social network to build social capital in a professional setting.

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